Archive for the ‘the old new’ Category

vintage laugh

July 29, 2012

One might think that only our over-consumerized society can produce flops like this to ease our existence, but no…I guess it’s in the human nature to always push the boundaries. After all, you never know, when you going to hit the new “must-have”. Here are some of my favorite inventions for the 20th century:

Face mask against snow storms

Pedestrian shovel to reduce number of accident injuries.

Glasses for reading while laying in bed.

The stroller in case of radio-active explosion.

Share a smoke?

Even the dudes from “Fast and Furious” would be jealous.

<images via here and here>

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old never dies

May 20, 2010

In proof my “perpetual historicity of the design” theory, I came across this article in NY Mag. NeoVictorian, NeoVersailles, NeoCountry…everything old is new again. It’s just a circle of life, which means that quality vintage will never go out of style. Transformed, reinvented, repurposed, reupholstered but it WILL go on. Make it a new investment.

Babel chair by Dutch design phenom Marcel Wanders ($530 at xo-design.com; available in late 2010).

Vintage chair with painted linen seat by Caitlin Conlow ($375 at Funkiture).

Baroque-style frames in translucent plastic ($12.95 at Site)

Sawhorse-leg table made of oak and powder-coated steel by South African design team Egg ($5,800 at Amaridian).

Bollywood mirror with digitally printed designs by Paola Navone ($2,690 at Property)

Customizable brass hanging candelabra by Lindsey Adelman ($4,800 at Matter).
Glass table with turned-column legs ($7,995 at ABC Carpet & Home).
Louisa settee with ragged cotton-and-linen upholstery ($2,498 at Anthropologie).
Acrylic Julius Caesar mini-bust by Jeffrey Harris ($30 at Hadley Antiques)
White lacquered-wood table by Romani Saccani ($4,200 at Property)
<images via www.nymag.com>

the old new: polka dot ceiling lights

May 5, 2010

It’s been a while since my last public copycat unveil but this is a good one. Flipping though last issue of Conde Nast Traveler I had one of those deja vu experiences with the ceiling lights by Marcel Breuer now found in Buenos Aires.Check out by yourself and don’t forget to VOTE for your favorite at the end.

THE OLD:  Whitney Museum, NY by Marcel Breuer, 1966

Breuer’s bold gestures doesn’t end with the massive stepping exterior of the museum, but continues into the hall with the very architectural yet simple lighting decision.

On the black ceiling surface the series of the pendants looks more like the recessed concaves. The interplay of the positive and negative spaces really fools the eye.

THE NEW: Isabel Bar, Buenos Aires by “Have no idea who…searched all through Internet”, 200?

This new “to be seen” spot is located next door from the celeb’s favorite dining spot Casa Cruz in Palermo. The menu of drinks changes hourly, so it’ll get you from “hangover” all through steamy Palermo night, with the loud upbeat house and glitzy dressed crowd. Waiters sell “Isabelinas”, casino-type chips used at the bar as scrip. Jeez..if only Breuer knew…

I apologize for the picture quality, had to scan from the magazine.

So which one is your favorite?


<images via 1, 2, Conde Nast Traveler>

the old new: malachite

April 9, 2010

As Mr. Wearstler is moving away from her “David-Hicks phase” (on which I’m yet to do the old new post) and into the “Tony-Duquette phase”, this new comparison is quite an obvious one. Malachite and its luscious pattern has been a signature of the world-famous designer. Native Angelino, Tony Duquette was the first American designer to held a single-man exhibition in Louvre Museum, Paris. Then recent burst of interest to the artist has been boosted by the book “More is More: Tony Duquette” published by Hutton Willkinson, Duquette’s business partner.

By the way, don’t forget to vote for your favorite at the end of the post.

The OLD: Tony Duquette (1914 – 1999)

Dawnridge dining (Duquette’s home in LA) featuring malachite wall finish, tableware and his signature malachite cotton pattern tablecloth.

The NEW: Kelly Wearstler (200?)

Viceroy Miami

Malachite veneer, malachite pattern fabric, walnut wood panels, lots of mirrors and even the punch of red…locate 10 differences


<images via 1, 2, 3, 4>

the old new: skylights vs. lights

March 19, 2010

This old new reference came across while I was browsing the coolest design website ever. The Japanese interior design company Wonder Wall, established by Masamichi Katayama, has a large variety of very inspiring projects and this one, which I  found  rather inspired….by Alvaro Alto Viipuri Library, Finland.

The NEW: The dining area of the Cinagro Kitchen & Market, Tokyo 2007.

This is an organic food market and cafe restaurant located in the Omotesando area. The aim was to create an atmosphere that would exude freshness and comfort.

Here the effect is achieved by the recessed ceiling with the cove lighting.

The OLD: The Viipuri Library by Alvar Aalto, 1935

The Library in Vyborg (Viipuri Library) was designed by alvar Aalto and completed in 1935. It is a masterpiece of International Modernism in both European and global terms.

Here the the ceiling planes is punctured with the skylight to bring in the natural light into the reading areas of the library.

So which one is your favorite?


<images via www.wonder-wall.com and www.alvaraalto.fi>

the old new: urband dwelling

March 12, 2010

Looking through another Best Building of the Year 2009 Award Winner, gave me that “I-think-I’ve-seen-it-somewhere” though. But urban dwelling is a timely issue at any decade and here improving the old concept can be only beneficial.

So here we come:

The OLD: Habitat’67 in Montreal, Quebec, Canada by Moshe Safdi for “Man and his World” Expo in 1967.

Safdie’s dwelling complex ‘Habitat’ was designed to give privacy, fresh air, sunlight and suburban amenities in an urban location. The project was designed to create affordable housing with close but private quarters, each equipped with a garden. The building was believed to illustrate the new lifestyle people would live in increasingly crowded cities around the world.

The NEW: The Mountain Dwellings by BIG Architects in Copenhagen, Denmark.

But here, the program is 2/3 parking and 1/3 living. How many ugly parking structures are out there, so why don’t we use them as the base for the terraced housing blocks? The parking area needs to be connected to the street, and the homes require sunlight, fresh air and views, thus all apartments have roof gardens facing the sun, amazing views and parking on the 10th floor. The Mountain Dwellings appear as a suburban neighbourhood of garden homes flowing over a 10-storey building – suburban living with urban density.

So which one is your favorite?

<images via www.archdaily.com and www.greatbuildings.com>


the old new:tree mural

March 6, 2010

I’m a strong believer that everything new is long forgotten old. And being a huge fan of history, I find the past the best source of inspiration. So with that in mind, i decided to start the new category on my blog, called “the old new” where I would post any “now-then” projects that cross my path.

The first one is Mary MacDonald vs. Paul Poiret.

The NEW: Living room of Jennifer and Bert Salke’s house in Beverly Hills. Designed by Mary MacDonald. Mural by Jefferson Miles.

The OLD: 1924. Bedroom by Paul Poiret, a famous French fashion designer, whose passion occasionally has spread into the interior design world.

Here’s the bohemian bedroom with ethereal Asian-inspired tree and oriental rugs with heavy tassels.

So which one is your favorite?

<images via www.marymacdonald.com and www.access.decorati.com>